#drawtober

Inktober and the Creative Challenge

Look. I know it’s still September. But if Wal-Mart gets to put up the spiderwebs and skeletons, then so do I. 

IT’S HALLOWEEN TIME EVERYONE.

Today’s visuals brought to you by Chroma’s own,  Bee !

Today’s visuals brought to you by Chroma’s own, Bee!

Over the last few years, I’ve come to celebrate October more and more. The leading source of inspiration for me isn’t as much the holiday as it is a creative event that has sprung up thanks to the internet called Inktober. For the uninitiated, Inktober is a month-long creative challenge for visual artists who are given a one-word prompt daily, from which they are to conceptualize and draw in physical ink. It’s a huge hit on Twitter and Instagram, with a near-endless stream of archived work you can find via #inktober on the web. 

As the challenge has gained greater participation each year, many visual artists have come to adapt it to their own styles by removing the ink-based restrictions and changing the name to “Drawtober,” even going as far as to create an entirely different set of prompts (I like how this pays a sort of unspoken homage to Inktober’s legacy). Thus, Inktober’s explosion has set off a chain reaction of art challenges that I think will only grow greater in the near future.

bee double.jpg

Last year as I anticipated voraciously scrolling, gawking, and bookmarking throughout the upcoming ARTtober season, I wanted to be a part of the fun despite my inability to make any sort of visual art (I don’t count editing and arranging my own album art). The idea to work within one of my own mediums occurred to me, then a name came to me like a bolt from the blue: Scrawltober. That month I did my best to follow the Inktober prompts with my abilities as a creative writer. I wrote short stories, haikus, letters, I re-told dreams, all totaling to around 22 pieces, where I fell off at the end. It was a thrill and a confidence booster to see that I was capable of writing even without a mystical encounter with inspiration. It planted the seed in me for what would become a drive toward understanding the perfection of craft, now a common theme for my blog writing. 

The dog toy lay, slain

I heat up some leftovers

He gets a treat, too


“Exhausted” Scrawltober 2018, Day 6

Creative challenges are fantastic. They encourage you to do the most effective thing possible when striving to become a more prolific artist: get your hands dirty and make something. Sometimes the works born of these challenges become full-fledged works that people sell (see Chroma’s own Bee and her fantastic 2018 Inktober journal zine), other times the pieces are left incomplete or as a flawed, essential stepping stone in your creative journey. Whatever the case may be, if this sort of creative movement inspires you, if it challenges you, go for it. No matter what your creative medium might be, ARTober is for everyone. If you need a cool name, use Scrawltober, Dronetober (music), Sculptober, Knitober, Photober… whatever inspires/terrifies you the most.